is it ok to have 2 laege handfuls of spinach daily?

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I MEAN i know its very healthy, but are there any sid eeffects to alot of spinach…i have 2 handfuls a day, i know i should alternate say every week, but is ok generally speaking….ive never had that much spinach before in my life..so just wondering..and thats the easiest and cheapest green leafy veg so its convenient to buy that most of the time…

thankyou very much

  1. Lenore added:

    From http://www.foodrenegade.com/tag/creamed-spinach/ :

    It’s the oxalic acid that scares me. What? You’ve never heard of oxalic acid? Well, don’t be embarrassed. Neither had I until I read Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions (a Food Renegade Must Read). The acid is present in raw spinach and blocks the absorption of calcium and iodine. Mildly cooking spinach neutralizes the malevolent acid.

    I think I read this same thing in one of Dr. Andrew Weil’s book. I’m not saying to never eat raw spinach but it might be best to do it in moderation. Try Googling "oxalic acid" and see what you find about that.

  2. Solomio added:

    Interesting that the quote states that oxalic acid ‘blocks the absorption of calcium.’ The calcium that is ‘blocked’ is the natural calcium that is present within the dark green, leafy leaves of the spinach, itself. :o All dark green leafy vegetables contain calcium. The natural oxalic acid within the spinach, doesn’t block calcium from other sources in the meal, such as cheese or milk.

    Cranberry/cranberry juice also contains some oxalic acid.
    I like to drink cold cranberry juice’. The type of cranberry juice I prefer is the form that has water and a sweetener added. Concentrated cranberry juice, in its freshly squeezed, unadulterated form is too bitter for my taste.

    My solution, to offset the calcium leeching properties of the cranberry juice I drink, is to take a calcium supplement. I would take a calcium supplement anyway but I have been adding a little more since I love cranberry juice. Calcium citrate is my favorite form of supplemental calcium. I like the citrate form because it absorbs easier in the gut than the carbonate form, yet is still reasonably priced. I usually buy the ‘store brand’ of most supplements, including calcium citrate, mainly because it is usually the most reasonably priced brand.

    It makes sense to me, for what its worth, to take extra calcium when I eat spinach, too. I get caught up in eating raw spinach during the summer when I eat more salads. I don’t like the ‘sand’ I have to wash out of it, though.
    I never cared that much for the limp, cooked form of spinach but now I know WHY my mother always cooked it instead of using it raw in salads. Now, how did my mother ‘know’, that cooking heat destroyed the oxalic acid?. :roll

    This has gotten me wondering about the bottled cranberry juice I drink; does it contain oxalic acid?

    All bottled juices are pasteurized, unless the bottle has a statement from the bottler stating otherwise. Pasteurization means that the pasteurized food product has been ‘heated’, cooked to a certain temperature to kill off any and all bacteria that may be present within the food/drink.
    This process prevents bacteria from growing within the food/drink product.

    Canned food products are heated, cooked during the canning process for the same purpose, to kill off all bacteria that could be present within the canned food product. Unfortunately, heat also kills off enzymes too. So canned pineapple doesn’t contain the digestive enzymes that fresh pineapple contains.

    Milk you buy in a regular grocery store is pasteurized, and bottled juices are also pasteurized for the same purpose; to kill off bacteria that could be present within the milk and juices.

    Maybe the bottled, sweetened cranberry juice I love to drink doesn’t have any oxalic acid in it, after all?

    Woo hoo!

    Solomio :o
    .

  3. Lenore added:

    Yes, they’ve been flash pasteurizing juices for some years now. There are some places where you can get organic freshly squeezed juices, squeezed right there to order, but most all the bottled ones are flash pasteurized, which is why I don’t buy juices much anymore. I’ve got a Jack La Lanne juicer sitting here sealed in a box which I’ve never used. I bought it just before I was forced to move out of the place I had lived in for 11 years because my landlord’s son became very ill and he wanted to move him in there (a guest unit behind a house). The place I’m in now has a small little kitchenette converted from a closet and I still haven’t gotten it organized to the point of where I’ve figured out where I can set up a juicer.

    Solomio, this man Joseph Hirt, http://chiology.com/ , recommended a brand of supplements to me called Catie’s Whole Food Supplements. So far I’ve tried the greens powder and the calcium plus. I also just ordered her Vitamin C powder just now. It looks really good. http://peaceful-planet.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=210

  4. Solomio added:

    Lenore,
    I will look into the information on the supplements.

    These days I take mostly minerals and digestive enzymes plus some antioxidants like grapeseed and good old dependable vitamin C.

    Solomio :o
    .

  5. Ryan added:

    I MEAN i know its very healthy, but are there any sid eeffects to alot of spinach…i have 2 handfuls a day, i know i should alternate say every week, but is ok generally speaking….ive never had that much spinach before in my life..so just wondering..and thats the easiest and cheapest green leafy veg so its convenient to buy that most of the time…

    thankyou very much

    I see no problem with it. Spinach is nutrient-rich and has a lot of benefits.

    The key to a proper diet is balance. Unless there is a specific problem with it (food allergy, known acne-causing food, etc.), it’s important to eat a wide variety of food and get your nutrients from as many sources as possible.

    If you’re eating nothing but sugars, processed grains, cheese, and red meat, and your only real nutritional intake is 2 large handfuls of spinach per day… Well, then there might be a problem. But as a part of balanced diet? Go for it! :)

    edit: Just don’t forget about the other greens. Mustard greens, for example, and even broccoli are great nutritional sources. Mix it up!

  6. Lenore added:

    I put on hold at the library at book by Victoria Boutenko called Green for Life. I’ll report back when I read it. http://www.greenforlife.com/